Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT IS IDÉLABORATORIET?
Idélaboratoriet is a consulting company specializing in creativity and innovation. Idélaboratoriet was founded in 2000.

WHAT DOES IDÉLABORATORIET DO?
Idélaboratoriet works in the field of creativity and innovation. We create value for our clients for example through innovation strategy planning, facilitation of creative processes, training programs in professional idea creation and implementation of digital idea management solutions.

WHAT DOES "IDÉLABORATORIET" MEAN?
Idélaboratoriet is Swedish for The Idea Lab.

WHERE IS IDÉLABORATORIET LOCATED?
Idélaboratoriet was founded in Sweden and has its headquarters in Malmö in southern Sweden, but works with clients worldwide.

WHAT DOES CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION REALLY MEAN?
Idélaboratoriet likes to say that creativity is a process of getting original ideas that have some sort of value and innovation is the profitable implementation of creativity.

HOW DO YOU CONTACT IDÉLABORATORIET?
Call +46 734 340031. Please do not hesitate to contact us for a discussion on how we can help your organization!

Latest

#25 An Innovation Bubble?

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The Serious Innovation Newsletter #25

In the eighties we had the real estate bubble. Around the millennium we had the dotcom crash. Is the next big busting balloon the term and business of innovation? In a recently released report Boston Consulting Group finds interesting facts stating that innovation spending is growing faster and faster, but very few are satisfied with the results, and even less have a good way of measuring the innovation impact on the bottom line. Let’s look at some of the major points in this survey asking 1,070 executives globally about their innovation situation.

In the eighties we had the real estate bubble. Around the millennium we had the dotcom crash. Is the next big busting balloon the term and business of innovation? In a recently released report Boston Consulting Group finds interesting facts stating that innovation spending is growing faster and faster, but very few are satisfied with the results, and even less have a good way of measuring the innovation impact on the bottom line. Let’s look at some of the major points in this survey asking 1,070 executives globally about their innovation situation.

“Innovation remains a top strategic focus for many companies; with 72 percent of the executives we surveyed ranking it a top-three strategic priority versus 66 percent in 2005.” This truly is interesting. What a significant change from just four to five years ago. And what a great world we will have in the future with all this fantastic brains of ours working full time on creating a new world!

“Seventy-two percent of respondents said their companies will increase spending on innovation in 2006.” OK, now it is time to stop praising and start being real. On what are they starting to increase their spending? Innovation is such a misused word. Innovation strategies would be a great first thing to start spending money on. What kind of innovator do organizations really want to be – classical, Darwinists or just pure copycats? Most companies should start by that instead of just throwing money on a pop word.

”At the same time, many executives—nearly half of those surveyed—remain unsatisfied with the financial returns on their companies’ investments in innovation.” Sure, if you do not know where you are going, how can you end up where you want? The measures of innovation are and have always been kind of a problem. We all need to shape up there and figure out methods that combine the financial key figures with a more human perspective, because we all know that too many numbers too early in the process stigmatizes innovation.

“Executives consider Apple Computer, Google, 3M, Toyota Motor, and Microsoft the world’s most innovative companies, with Apple the clear leader.”  I am so tired of hearing about the creativity of Apple… OK, they have done some nice things, but they are also a disaster when it comes to making money. Please people – seek new examples and new horizons. I do not want to hear another innovation lecture ever again about the Ipod – a lecture about that is in itself very, very NOT creative.

“Globalization, organizational issues (such as metrics and measurement, structure, and people), and leadership remain three of the biggest challenges facing companies that are seeking to become more innovative.” It may seem fluffy, but is the truth. You will not get innovation without the visionary leaders and the organizational experiments. And you definitely will not get more ideas when there is a war going on in Lebanon – whoever is to blame. That is a crisis. But is innovation really in a crisis? Lester Craft from Innovation Forum says that ”Business innovation is in a state of crisis. What’s more, the trajectory is steepening – which is to say, the stakes are rising and the altitude from which innovation could come crashing down is getting higher and higher.” That maybe seems a little bit too much of a tabloid statement, but still it has an underlining notion of that we have to stay sharp when discussing innovation. Do not let people get away with it. Ask them what they really mean and what they really do to make innovation happen. Only then can we see to it that innovation is not a bubble. Only then can we continue to seriously innovate!

For further reading please follow this links to find the two reports – Innovation 2006 and Measuring Innovation 2006:

http://www.bcg.com/publications/files/2006_Innovation_Survey_report.pdf

http://www.bcg.com/publications/files/2006_Innovation_Metrics_Survey.pdf

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